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TECHNICAL DATA
Duplicating Film
E-2529 • February, 2001

KODAK PROFESSIONAL EKTACHROME
Duplicating Film EDUPE

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Contents

Description

KODAK PROFESSIONAL EKTACHROME Duplicating Film EDUPE is a low-contrast color reversal duplicating film designed for making high-quality duplicates from originals on KODAK EKTACHROME or KODACHROME Films. It features excellent color reproduction, extremely fine grain, and very high sharpness.

Although its primary application is producing duplicate slides, you can also use this film for making copy slides of high-contrast color reflection prints.

FEATURES

BENEFITS

  • Optimized spectral sensitivity and tone scale
  • Versatile performance
  • Exceptional tone and color reproduction from a variety of original film types
  • Extended tone scale latitude
  • Increased highlight and shadow detail
  • Faithful reproduction of original tone scale
  • Richer blacks
  • Cleaner whites
  • Finest grain available in a color reversal duplicating film
  • Outstanding reproduction of detailed images—even with enlargement
  • The perfect match for today's finer-grained films
  • Excellent latent-image keeping
  • No color or contrast shifts within a roll, or from the start to the end of the day
  • Superb reciprocity characteristics
  • No tone scale compromise with exposures from 10 seconds to 1/100 second
  • Flexibility to handle long exposures for dodge-and-burn or short exposures to maximize productivity
  • Robust processing performance
  • Consistency from run to run and day to day
  • Common emulsion technology
  • Same great results from both sheet and roll formats
  • Same rich color dyes as KODAK PROFESSIONAL EKTACHROME Films E100S, E100SW, E100VS, and E200
  • Scanning compatibility with other popular KODAK EKTACHROME Films

Sizes Available

Sizes and catalog numbers may differ from country to country. See your dealer who supplies KODAK PROFESSIONAL Products.

Rolls

Code / Spec No.

Acetate Base

CAT No.

135-36

EDUPE

5-mil (0.13 mm)

134 2641

35 mm x 100 ft

EDUPE/SP663

195 2837

35 mm x 400 ft

EDUPE/SP663

114 7461

35 mm x 1000 ft

EDUPE/SP663

197 5358

46 mm x 100 ft

EDUPE/SP446

122 1985

61.5 mm x 100 ft

EDUPE/SP816

102 3035

70 mm x 100 ft[a]

EDUPE / SP481[a]

813 7523

120

EDUPE

139 5268

[a] Perforated on both edges.

Sheets

Size

Film Code
Film code graphic

Acetate Base

CAT No.

10
50

4 x 5 in.

EDUPE

8.2-mil
(0.21 mm)

802 4531
890 6943

10
50

8 x 10 in.

EDUPE

133 1941
163 8444

Storage and Handling

Load and unload film in subdued light.

Store unexposed film in a refrigerator at 13°C (55°F) or lower in the original sealed package. To avoid moisture condensation on film that has been refrigerated, allow the film to warm up to room temperature before opening the package. Process film as soon as possible after exposure.

Protect processed slides and transparencies from strong light, and store them in a cool, dry place. For more information, see KODAK Publication No. E-30, Storage and Care of KODAK Photographic Materials—Before and After Processing.

Darkroom Recommendations

Do not use a safelight. Handle unprocessed film in total darkness.

Exposure Guidelines

You can expose this film with enlargers, optical printers, contact-printing equipment, or cameras. A diffuse optical system offers the least difficulty with dust and scratches.

Certain factors in the darkroom will influence the quality of your results. You can optimize your results by taking these steps:

  • Make sure the darkroom is lighttight. Check for light leaks around doors and vents, and mask them if necessary.
  • Paint the walls, ceiling, and other prominent surfaces flat black. Minimize or eliminate other reflective materials and digital displays.
  • Avoid fluorescent tubes in the darkroom—they emit a weak illumination just after being turned off.
  • Install a dark slide in any drawers used to store unprocessed film. Verify that it is lighttight by placing an unexposed sheet in the drawer, partially covered by an opaque material. Close the drawer, and leave the room lights on for four hours. If, after processing the film, you see a density difference or a line corresponding to the opaque material, the drawer is not lighttight.

Enlargers

With either tungsten or pulsed-xenon illumination, set the illumination level at the exposure plane to one footcandle (10.8 lux). Use a light integrator to measure pulsed-xenon illumination. With either illumination, measure without correction filters in the light beam. Enlargers must have a heat-absorbing glass, and an ultraviolet-absorbing filter (such as KODAK WRATTEN Gelatin Filter No. 2B or a KODAK Acetate Filter / Color Printing CP2B).

Start with the filter pack printed on the film carton. Then add any necessary filters listed in the table under Filter Recommendations.

Note: Very short exposure times may not be repeatable. Consult the timer manufacturer for exposure limitations. If your exposure is too short for your timer, add neutral density filtration.

Caution Caution: Consult the manufacturer of pulsed-xenon lamps for ventilation recommendations and information on ultraviolet radiation.

Optical Printers

If your equipment holds filters between the light source and the original transparency, use KODAK Color Printing Filters (Acetate) for color-balance adjustments. Use KODAK WRATTEN Gelatin Filter / Color Compensating if you must place the filters between the lens and the duplicating film. Also use a heat-absorbing glass, an ultraviolet-absorbing filter (such as KODAK WRATTEN Gelatin Filter No. 2B or a KODAK Acetate Filter / Color Printing CP2B).

Start with the filter pack printed on the film carton. Then add any necessary filters listed in the table under Filter Recommendations.

Note: When duplicating mounted slides, adjust the printer to a 1.03X magnification. While some cropping will occur, this magnification ensures that none of the slide mount will be included in the duplicate. To verify correct lens magnification, first project the original slide, and measure the distance between two widely separated points on the projected image. Then project the duplicate slide, and measure the distance between the same two points. Divide the distance measured on the duplicate by the distance measured on the original to determine the lens magnification.

Contact-Printing Equipment

Use an enlarger as the light source for contact printing original transparencies onto the duplicating film. Use clear, scratch-free glass of good optical quality, and keep all surfaces clean to minimize problems with dust. The original transparency must be in complete contact with the glass during the exposure for sharp images. Also, the emulsion side of the original transparency should be in contact with the emulsion side of the duplicating film. Duplicate transparencies made by contact printing will have slightly higher contrast than those made by using an optical system.

35 mm Cameras

You can make duplicate slides with a single-lens reflex camera and a suitable slide-duplicating attachment.

Tungsten (3200 K) Illumination. As a starting point, set the camera ISO or ASA speed indicator to the exposure index printed on the film box. Set the shutter speed at 1 second.

Standard Illuminator (5000 K). As a starting point, set the camera speed indicator to the exposure index printed on the film carton. Set the shutter speed at 1/8 second.

Electronic Flash. Make a trial exposure series with the camera shutter set at its flash synchronization speed and the flash unit set on Manual.

Start with the filter pack printed on the film carton. Then add any necessary filters listed in the table under Filter Recommendations.

For maximum sharpness, place the filters between the original transparency and the light source.

Make an exposure series in 1/3-stop increments to determine the best exposure for your film and equipment. If the lowest film speed setting on your camera is 25, set the speed indicator at 25 and adjust the aperture as follows.

Exposure Index Provided with the Film

Increase the Lens Aperture by

12
6
3

1 stop
2 stops
3 stops

Distinguishing Originals on KODACHROME and KODAK EKTACHROME Films

To help you identify the type of original being duplicated, here is a brief summary of Kodak films and their processes:

KODACHROME Films: All KODACHROME Films have a "relief image," that is, the image appears to be dimensional or "raised" on the emulsion side. KODACHROME Film originals typically require CC10C more filtration than KODAK EKTACHROME Film originals.
KODAK EKTACHROME Films: EKTACHROME Films do not have a raised or "relief" image on the emulsion side; both sides are smooth.

Filter Recommendations

When using tungsten illumination, start with the basic filter pack printed on the film box. The table below shows the additional filtration needed when you use this film with other light sources. In all cases, use these filters in addition to the filtration printed on the box and a KODAK WRATTEN Gelatin Filter No. 2B.

The following filter recommendations are for KODAK PROFESSIONAL WRATTEN Gelatin Filters / Color Compensating. If you use dichroic filters, you may have to make some adjustments.

Pulsed Xenon

Electronic Flash

5000 K Illuminator

Filtration for EKTACHROME Films

85B

10M + 60Y

30R

Filtration for KODACHROME Films

85B + 10C

50Y

20R

Flash exposure is based on electronic flash (5500 K) with appropriate color-conversion, color-balancing, and ultraviolet filters. If the electronic flash source is higher or lower in color temperature than 5500 K, increase the filtration as follows.

  • 6000 K to 5500 K: add KODAK WRATTEN Gelatin Filter / Light Balancing No. 81
  • 5000 K to 5500 K: add KODAK PROFESSIONAL Gelatin Filter / Light Balancing No. 82

KODAK WRATTEN Gelatin Filters and KODAK Acetate Filters are now distributed by Tiffen Co. L.L.C. In the U.S. call 800-368-6257 or view their website at www.tiffen.com.

Exposure

Make a series of exposures in 1/3-stop increments, starting with the filtration provided.

Standard 1/3-stop Exposure-Index ratings:
4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12, 16, 20, 25, 32, 40

Note: Roll format film labels include a starting point Exposure Index.

Reciprocity Characteristics

Typical exposure times are 1 second for tungsten illumination, 1/1000 second (or shorter) for electronic flash, and 10 seconds for pulsed-xenon illumination. You are not, however, limited to these exposures. EDUPE Film has excellent reciprocity characteristics. You can shorten times to increase productivity or lengthen them as needed to dodge and burn difficult originals.

Adjusting Density

If your initial exposure series is too high in density (underexposed), increase the exposure and make a new exposure series. If the whole series is too low in density (overexposed), decrease the exposure and make a new series. When you increase or decrease exposure, try to adjust the aperture rather than the exposure time (see Adjustments for Emulsion-Number Changes).

Adjusting Color Balance

Judge the color balance of duplicate transparencies made for projection by viewing the projected images. You can also view transparencies on a standard illuminator (5000 K). The standard illuminator provides the correct light intensity and spectral distribution characteristics for critical analysis of color transparencies. See ANSI Standard PH2.30–1989, Viewing Conditions—Photographic Prints, Transparencies, and Photomechanical Reproductions, for the specifications of a standard illuminator (5000 K).

When you view a duplicate transparency, you may find that you want to change the color balance. To adjust the filter pack, subtract a filter of the same color as the overall hue, or add a filter that is complementary to the overall hue. Use the information in the table below to determine the filter adjustment.

If Color Balance Is Too ­

Subtract These Filters

OR

Add These Filters

Yellow

Yellow

Magenta + Cyan

Magenta

Magenta

Cyan + Yellow

Cyan

Cyan

Magenta + Yellow

Blue

Magenta + Cyan

Yellow

Green

Cyan + Yellow

Magenta

Red

Magenta + Yellow

Cyan

If you use filters between the original transparency and the duplicating film, keep the number of filters in the filter pack to a minimum. Using more than three CC filters will result in a significant loss in sharpness. If the filter pack contains all three subtractive colors (neutral density), remove the lowest-value filter and reduce the other two by the same value as follows:

Filter Pack

40C

40M

20Y

Subtract neutral density

-20C

-20M

-20Y

 


Adjusted filter pack

20C

20M

 

You can further reduce 20C + 20M to CC20B.

When you change the filter pack, you must adjust the exposure to compensate for differences in filter density and in the number of filter surfaces. Otherwise, the density of the new duplicate will differ from the density of the previous duplicate.

The table below gives filter factors for adjusting exposure. The filter factors take into account the effects of filter surfaces.

Filter

Change Exposure By

Filter

Change Exposure By

05Y
10Y
20Y

None
None
None

05R
10R
20R

1/3 stop
1/3 stop
1/3 stop

05M
10M
20M

1/3 stop
1/3 stop
1/2 stop

05G
10G
20G

None
1/3 stop
1/2 stop

05C
10C
20C

None
1/3 stop
1/3 stop

05B
10B
20B

None
1/3 stop
1/2 stop

Adjustments for Emulsion-Number Changes

When you change to a new film emulsion, you may have to change the exposure and filter pack. You will find the recommended filtration for each emulsion on the film carton.

To calculate the filtration for a new emulsion, start with the filter pack you are currently using. Then subtract the recommended filter pack for the old emulsion from the filter pack you are using. This will give you the difference between the actual filter pack and the recommended pack. Finally, add the recommended filter pack for the new emulsion to obtain your new filter pack.

Current filter pack

50C

40Y

Subtract recommended pack for old emulsion

-30C

-25Y

 


Difference

20C

15Y

Add recommended pack for new emulsion

+20C

+40Y

 


new filter pack

40C

55Y

If you make significant changes to the exposure time to compensate for filter-pack adjustments, you may have to make additional changes in filtration. If possible, adjust the aperture rather than the exposure time.

Be sure to follow the storage and processing recommendations so that your adjusted filter pack will remain valid.

Copying Reflection Originals

You can use KODAK PROFESSIONAL EKTACHROME Duplicating Film EDUPE to copy color prints or other reflection copy such as paintings and drawings. If you use incandescent illumination (3000 to 3200 K), start with the filter-pack data packaged with the film, and then adjust filtration as required.

With low-contrast originals such as watercolors and pastels, you can obtain higher contrast in the duplicate by using a camera-original film such as KODAK EKTACHROME 64T Professional Film or KODAK EKTACHROME 100 Professional Film.

Processing

Process EDUPE Film in KODAK Chemicals, Process E-6.

As always, process control is important. KODAK Publication Z-119, Using KODAK Chemicals, Process E-6, or the KODAK Q-LAB Process Monitoring Service manual are sources for good quality-control procedures.

Retouching

Use KODAK E-6 Transparency Retouching Dyes. You can chemically retouch sheets on both the base and the emulsion side. Retouch only the emulsion side of the roll formats.

For information on retouching equipment, supplies, and techniques, see KODAK Publication No. E-68, Retouching Transparencies on KODAK EKTACHROME Film.

Printing Transparencies

You can reproduce images made on EDUPE Film by using a variety of Kodak materials.

Duplicate Color Transparencies

For direct printing, use—

KODAK PROFESSIONAL EKTACHROME Duplicating Film EDUPE
KODAK EKTACHROME RADIANCE III Overhead Material

Or make internegatives on KODAK Commercial Internegative Film, and print them on—

KODAK VERICOLOR Print Film
KODAK VERICOLOR Slide Film
KODAK PROFESSIONAL DURATRANS Display Material
KODAK PROFESSIONAL DURACLEAR Display Material

Color Prints

For direct printing, use—

KODAK EKTACHROME RADIANCE III Papers
KODAK EKTACHROME RADIANCE III S elect Material

Or make internegatives on KODAK Commercial Internegative Film, and print them on—

KODAK PROFESSIONAL PORTRA, SUPRA, and ULTRA III Papers
KODAK PROFESSIONAL DURAFLEX Print Material
KODAK PROFESSIONAL Color Metallic Paper

Digital Files

You can scan your image to a file and print digitally to—

KODAK PROFESSIONAL Digital III Color Paper
KODAK PROFESSIONAL DURATRANS Plus Digital Display Material
KODAK PROFESSIONAL DURACLEAR Plus Digital Display Material
KODAK PROFESSIONAL DURAFLEX Digital Print Material

Scanning Transparencies

For Graphic Arts Applications

The KODAK EKTACHROME Film family is characterized by sets of image dyes that perform very similarly when scanned. The scanner operator can set up one basic tone scale and color-correction channel for all EKTACHROME Films, and then optimize the tone scale and gray balance for the requirements of individual images.

Use the KODAK Color Input Target / Q-60E1 (4 x 5-inch transparency) or Q-60E3 (35 mm slide) to establish the setup for KODAK EKTACHROME Films on all scanners. These targets are manufactured to ANSI standards and represent the dye sets of all EKTACHROME Films.

For Photo CD Applications

Use the Universal E-6 Film Term to scan all KODAK EKTACHROME Films for KODAK Photo CD Imaging Workstation applications.

For Output to a Photo CD Player: Using the Universal E-6 Film Term should result in an image that closely matches your transparency in density, tone scale, and overall color balance when viewed on a player.

For Output to Devices Other than Photo CD Players: The YCC data that results from using the Universal E-6 Film Term is capable of producing a high-quality duplicate of your transparency in terms of density, tone scale, and color reproduction. The quality of your final reproduced image also depends on the capabilities of your output device, the viewing environment, and the procedure that is used.

Image Structure

The image structure classifications given here apply only to KODAK PROFESSIONAL EKTACHROME Duplicating Film EDUPE. However, image structure depends on the combination of the duplicating film, the original transparencies being duplicated, and the equipment being used.

Curves

These graphs are designed to be printed in landscape mode. They will print properly on most printers in their current page set-up of 100%. However, some printers may require adjustments to the browser page set-up in order to have the graph print on a single 8 1/2 x 11 inch sheet of paper.

MTF:

Curve

Characteristic:

Curve Rolls
Curve Sheets

Spectral Sensitivity:

Curve

Note: The contents of this publication are subject to change without notice.

Note: If you have questions or need assistance, contact your local Kodak representative.

Kodak, Kodak Professional, Duraclear, Duraflex, Duratrans, Ektachrome, Kodachrome, Portra, Radiance, Supra, Q-Lab, Ultra, Vericolor, and Wratten are trademarks.

(Return to Table of Contents)


Footnotes\Notices

NOTICE: The data in this publication represent product tested under the conditions of exposure and processing specified. They are representative of production coatings, and therefore do not apply to a particular box or roll of photographic material. They do not represent standards or specifications that must be met by Eastman Kodak Company. The company reserves the right to change and improve product characteristics at any time.

Kodak Professional Division Data Sheet
E-2529
Issued 02-01
Copyright, Eastman Kodak Company,2001